The Saturator

The Saturator is an overdrive pedal kit that can cover a wide range of gain effects, transitioning smoothly from a massive clean boost to a warm and saturated distortion with the turn of a knob.

The saturation is controlled with the "Soak" knob, which dials in the amount of symmetrical soft-clipping applied to the guitar signal. When fully counterclockwise , the signal is unaffected and clean. Rotating the knob clockwise will incrementally increase the soft-clipping, morphing from a clean signal through subtle-to-heavy saturated overdrive sounds and straight into distortion territory. The "Level" knob sets the overall volume of the clean or saturated output. Unity gain is at roughly 8 o'clock. With the "Soak" set to clean, rotating the "Level" knob clockwise will increase the level to upwards of 30 dB.

Samples:

Lead Sound Sample

Image
The Saturator - Lead Settings

Blues Sound Sample

Image
The Saturator - Blues Settings

Heavy Sound Sample

Image
The Saturator - Heavy Settings
Product Videos
Questions and Answers
Click each question to see its answers. Looking for general answers about Mod Kits? See our frequently asked questions.
Hello. How does this differ from the Thunder Drive? Thanks
Answers (3)
MichaelT
Staff Member
October 28th, 2019
The Saturator uses a feedback style of clipping rather than the clip to ground style used in the Thunderdrive. The feedback style is generally referred to soft clipping whereas the clip to ground method is hard clipping. The Saturator also uses a mosfet while the Thunderdrive uses a transistor.
Verified Answer
Anonymous
April 18th, 2020
The 4 diodes connected to number 2 pin of the soak pot means that pot is also controlling how much clipping you hear. With it turned all the way to the right they are essentially connected to pin three which is shunted to ground with a filter cap. This will produce the most distortion. Its not technically hard clipping, but not soft clipping either. If the pot is turned all the way to the left then they will be connected to pin 1 which will connect them from input to output which is the classic soft clipping arrangement. Of course the pot will allow you everything between that too which is harder to explain. The Thunderdrive uses classic hard clipping which is two diode in opposite directions going from output to ground. Hard clipping gives you a massive amount of distortion but at the price of major volume loss. Soft clipping doesn't give you a much distortion but you keep more volume which can intern overdrive your amp which will give you that classic rock distortion.
Anonymous
April 18th, 2020
ooops I was slightly wrong. Turning the pot all the way to the left connects the diodes to pin 1 (input to ground = little distortion) and all the way to the right connects them to output (Lots of clipping lots of distortion)
Hello, My 15 year old wants to build a pedal. Which one of your kits is the easiest to build for a total beginner with an eagerness to learn. thanks so much
Answers (1)
MichaelT
Staff Member
May 12th, 2020
The Piledriver is our favorite for first time builds. It's a pretty straight forward build and a very useful effect.
Verified Answer
Good on bass? Low-end loss? Do you sell any (bass) OD/dist pedals with blend controls? Thanks
Answers (1)
MichaelT
Staff Member
May 26th, 2020
Check out the Rock Bottom kit. It sounds like exactly what you're looking for. https://www.modkitsdiy.com/pedal/rock-bottom
Verified Answer
Have a question of your own? Ask us here!